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Noel Coward's "Present Laughter", The Kelvin Players, Bristol, runs from 12th April to 16th April

PUBLISHED: 16:32 16 March 2011 | UPDATED: 19:01 20 February 2013

Noel Coward's

Noel Coward's "Present Laughter", The Kelvin Players, Bristol, runs from 12th April to 16th April

It's the 1940s and The Kelvin Players invite you to meet Garry Essendine, a debauched womanizing drunk who never surfaces before noon, then dons a bathrobe until the twilight hours and then hits the town for dinner, dames and high life revelry.

"Present Laughter" Tues 12 April to Sat 16 April at 7.30 pm


by Noel Coward


Performed by The Kelvin Players


At The Kelvin Players' Studio Theatre, 253b Gloucester Road, Bishopston
Bristol, BS7 8NY



Full Price: 9.00
Concession Price: 7.00



Box Office Phone Number: 0117 959 3636
Buy tickets online:www.kelvinplayers.co.uk




Noel Coward's "Present Laughter" Preview Article by Theresa Roche


Celebrated playwright, Noel Coward, described "Present Laughter", written in 1939, as "a series of semi-autobiographical pyrotechnics" and The Kelvin Players are sure to in the words of the 1940's song "set the world on fire" and "light a flame in your heart"with their version of this show!


Meet the protagonist, Garry Essendine, a debauched womanizing drunk who never surfaces before noon, then dons a bathrobe until the twilight hours and then hits the town for dinner, dames and high life revelry. Garry is a famous comedian on the brink of travelling to Africa for a theatre tour of his show.


"Present Laughter" offers a hilarious glimpse into the escapades going on in Garry's dapper parlour in the few days before he leaves England. He desperately fends off adoring females like the glamorous Daphne. His vanity heightens the comedy, with announcements such as "Everybody worships me, it's nauseating". Yet there is also high comedy in his insecurity too, for he has just turned 40 and has a real fear of being middle-aged.


There are elements of farce as Garry tries to appease both his estranged wife Liz and his tolerant personal secretary, Monica. There are moments of women being pushed into guest rooms so as to avoid being seen by other women! Garry also has to deal with an enthusiastic young playwright, Roland Maule whose ego is bigger than his ability in Garry's opinion.


So does Garry finally escape to Africa and leave his entourage of unwanted fans behind him? Or is there a twist in the tale and does he end up with a sassy dame again after all?


Kelvin have set this show in the mid to late 1940s and have rustled up some sumptuous costumes and stylish decor. It is a rare chance to see a classic comedy that has stood the test of time and is as popular with audiences today as it was 70 years ago.


For an evening of jollification and amusement it is unbeatable and do watch out for Coward's snappy one-liners in this show!


Copyright Theresa Roche March 2011

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