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Local Vets Save Dogs from Hot Car at Horse Trials

PUBLISHED: 15:47 06 May 2011 | UPDATED: 19:19 20 February 2013

Local Vets Save Dogs from Hot Car at Horse Trials

Local Vets Save Dogs from Hot Car at Horse Trials

Vets Robert White-Adams and Rachel Whitear (from Companion Care in Weston) had a busy volunteer stint with the RSPCA at Badminton Horse Trials over the Easter week-end.

Vets Robert White-Adams and Rachel Whitear (from Companion Care in Weston) had a busy volunteer stint with the RSPCA at Badminton Horse Trials over the Easter week-end.



Practice owner Robert says Big countryside events like the horse trials always attract large crowds and many people take the family dog along to join in the fun. Inevitably with so many dogs around some of them end up needing veterinary treatment for minor ailments and bumps or scrapes. We were delighted to be invited by the RSPCA on behalf of the event organisers to provide a veterinary presence for dogs that found themselves in need.



Rachel continues It was looking like a quiet day with only a few minor ailments for us to attend to, but as the slightly over-cast morning brightened and the sun started shining, the RSPCA and their volunteer patrols became aware of a small number of dogs that had been left locked in cars throughout the huge car-park fields. Thankfully, even as the RSPCA were spotting these dogs, their owners were returning to their vehicles to get their dogs.



It should be stressed that every year the Horse Trial organisers go to great lengths to discourage people from leaving their dogs locked in their cars and to inform people about the risks of doing so. Sadly there are still some people who have not got the message.



Robert comments, In the early afternoon we got called to see two dogs trapped in a car. The owners evidently thought they had taken adequate precautions to prevent the car and the dogs from overheating by leaving gaps in the windows and tailgate. However, as the sun shone hotter the dogs were becoming distressed and starting to show signs of heat stroke. The RSPCA measured the temperature inside the car to be over 30C and at that point, working with the RSPCA and on-site police, the decision was made that we had to act to rescue the dogs from the car before they suffered heat stroke. In this case, both dogs were saved before they became seriously ill, and with appropriate treatment, both were all fine within an hour of being rescued.



Robert concludes, The message here is really simple. Dogs die in hot cars. On a hot or sunny day it is simply not possible to leave adequate ventilation to keep the interior of any model of car cool enough for a dog to be trapped in there for any length of time. If you will be away more than even a few minutes it is just not safe to leave your dog in that situation. These dogs were lucky that the RSPCA were on hand to help!

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